PART ll VOLUME 2
Policy Reasoned Justification
 
Housing
  6.1 THE ROLE OF THE PLAN
  6.2 TRENDS AND ISSUES
  6.3 OBJECTIVES
  6.4 POLICY JUSTIFICATION
   
 
TopContents
6.1 THE ROLE OF THE PLAN
6.1.1 In contrast to most metropolitan areas Wakefield District has a dispersed pattern of settlements which range in size from small village communities to the major urban area focused on the City of Wakefield itself. Moreover these settlements are separated by extensive tracts of open and, in many cases, attractive countryside. This pattern has ensured that there is a wide range of housing, in terms of type and quality, across the District.
6.1.2 Housing is by far the largest single urban land use type and new housing the most widespread form of new development in the District. Together with the wider residential environment therefore housing is a major component of the UDP, particularly, as it affects the quality of life of all residents and influences the attraction of further economic and commercial investment to the District. It also influences the investment programmes of the public utilities and all other providers of public services, and has a direct impact on employment levels in the construction and related industries.
6.1.3 One of the key objectives of the Council is to ensure that the people of Wakefield District have sufficient good quality housing which is suited to their needs in terms of its size, type and tenure. The UDP has an important role to play in meeting housing need through its land use strategy and by allocating land for all agencies involved in building new housing. New house-building will also contribute to the economic regeneration and revitalisation of the District.
6.1.4 Most housing needs will continue to be met from within the existing housing stock. The Plan also has a role in supporting the Council as Local Housing Authority in seeking to maintain and improve the existing dwelling stock. Ensuring the stock remains of a high quality not only helps secure the supply of housing for residents but also promotes the attractiveness of the District as a place in which to live and work and reduces the need for new house-building. The Government's revised version of Planning Policy Guidance Note 3: Housing (PPG3) published in March 2000 stresses the importance of adopting a co-ordinated approach to the preparation of the UDP and the Council's housing strategy.
   
 
TopContents
6.2 TRENDS AND ISSUES
6.2.1 One of the main factors which determines the scale of new housing provision is the growth in the number of new households. This growth arises from changing economic, social and demographic conditions. The original UDP made provision for 17,500 new dwellings to be built between April 1986 and March 2001 to meet the District's need for new housing. This figure was taken from the Secretary of State's Strategic Planning Guidance for West Yorkshire, as amended by the 1989 based household projections from the former Department of the Environment.
6.2.2 The current Plan rolls forward the housing provision to cover the period mid 1996 to mid-2006 and needs to take account of the latest guidance and information on future household growth. Strategic Planning Guidance for West Yorkshire was superseded by Regional Planning Guidance for Yorkshire & Humberside (RPG) which was issued by the then Secretary of State for the Environment in March 1996. It set out the scale of housing provision for each local authority in the region for the period 1991 to 2006, calculated from 1989-based population and household projections. A review of RPG was begun in 1997 and new Regional Planning Guidance for Yorkshire and the Humber was published in October 2001. This includes a revised regional housing requirement calculated from the latest, 1996-based, household projections, together with figures for each strategic planning authority. The current UDP takes account of the housing requirement for Wakefield District contained in the latest RPG.
6.2.3 The UDP must assess the adequacy of the existing land supply to meet future housing need and identify any additional land release which is necessary to meet future requirements. As a basis for this assessment the Council undertook a Joint Housing Land Availability Study with the House Builders Federation in 1997. PPG3 replaces the concept of joint housing land availability studies with urban capacity studies. Each local authority is to carry out such a study to establish how much additional housing can be accommodated within its urban areas. Further guidance is available from the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM) about carrying out these studies and a common method will be employed by all the local authorities in the region to ensure a consistent approach. It has not been possible to carry out an urban capacity study in Wakefield MD for the current UDP but a future study will inform the next review of the Plan.
6.2.4 The development strategy of the current UDP continues that of the original Plan and reflects the priority attached to regenerating those parts of the District suffering from above average levels of deprivation. The scale and distribution of housing allocations are designed to support the Council's objectives for regeneration as part of wider programmes of investment.
6.2.5 PPG3 sets out the Government's proposals for meeting society's need for additional housing and for creating more sustainable forms of development through:
  • giving priority to re-using previously developed land in urban areas;
  • bringing empty homes back into use;
  • converting existing buildings to housing;
  • employing a sequential approach to the identification and release of housing land;
  • building in ways which provided greater accessibility to jobs, education and other services and facilities by public transport;
  • reducing car dependence by facilitating more walking and cycling;
  • making more efficient use of land by reviewing planning policies and standards.
6.2.6 In its document "Planning for the Communities of the Future", February 1998, the Government set a target of 60% for the national proportion of new homes built on previously developed ("brownfield") land, to be achieved over the next ten years (i.e. by 2008). PPG3 notes that RPG will set a regional re-cycling target which should contribute to achieving the national target, and that local planning authorities should adopt targets in their UDP's which will contribute to the regional target and are consistent with information from urban capacity studies. RPG proposes a regional target of 60% and a provisional target for Wakefield MD of 61%. RPG recognises that this figure will need to be reviewed, as information from an urban capacity study becomes available. The new housing allocations in the current UDP have been identified in accordance with the Government's principles of sustainable development and its target for re-cycled land.
6.2.7 The Council has recently completed the Wakefield Housing Needs Survey. This shows a shortage of affordable properties to rent and purchase in parts of the District, particularly dwellings for single people and couples. At the same time there is a low demand for existing family housing to rent in some areas. Provision needs to be made for a wide range of house types to meet the range of need. Steps need to be taken to safeguard or improve the quality of the local environment to help make existing housing attractive to live in.
6.2.8 The role of the local authority as a provider of new housing has changed since the 1988 Housing Act to that of an enabler. Continuing low levels of capital allocation mean that the Council will be unable to build any new houses for the foreseeable future. The main way the Council can directly influence new affordable housing is through its Annual Development Programme with Housing Associations.
6.2.9 It is anticipated that the bulk of the new housing will be provided by the private sector, together with Housing Associations and other public sector agencies. Consequently the Council, in its enabling role, is developing effective partnership arrangements with these other agencies, using its extensive land holdings, to retain some control and influence in meeting housing needs.
6.2.10 The need for new dwellings depends in part on the scale of clearance of the existing housing stock during the Plan period. The Council's Stock Condition Survey reveals that over 10% of the District's public and private housing is unfit. Only in a limited number of cases does unfitness lead to demolition. However, in areas of poor quality housing with low demand it has been accepted that selective demolition and rebuilding is the best approach to achieve regeneration. The Plan's housing requirement includes an allowance for future clearance (see paragraph 6.4.2).
6.2.11 The condition of the older housing stock is deteriorating because of inadequate investment and unfitness is increasingly becoming a problem. The Council gives high priority to the maintenance and improvement of the housing stock to ensure that housing needs are met and a wide range of choice is available. It is developing strategies which include identifying priority areas, targeting grants, establishing partnerships and programmes under the Single Regeneration Budget and Renewal Areas to suit different situations. The UDP aims to support these strategies and programmes.
   
 
TopContents
6.3 OBJECTIVES
6.3.1 The objectives of the UDP towards housing may be summarised as being to:-
(i) identify and provide sufficient land to meet the housing needs of the District up to 2006.
(ii) ensure that a range of sites is available in terms of their size, type and location to meet the demand from various sectors of the housing market.
(iii) ensure that new housing is sustainable, being well located in relation to existing settlements, employment opportunities, transport routes and available services and facilities.
(iv) encourage the provision of housing for special needs groups.
(v) encourage the maintenance and improvement of the existing dwelling stock.
(vi) increase the attractiveness of the District as a place in which to live and work.
(vii) assist the process of economic regeneration through investment and renewal of the housing stock.
   
 
TopContents
6.4 POLICY JUSTIFICATION
 
 
Scale and Type of New Housing
6.4.1 Whilst most housing needs will continue to be met from within the existing stock, new housing will be needed to accommodate new households which form in future and to replace unfit and outworn dwellings which are demolished.
6.4.2 When considering the need for new housing during the lifetime of the Plan the Council must have regard to the latest Regional Planning Guidance for Yorkshire and the Humber. RPG published in March 1996 identifies a requirement for 1,000 new houses a year in Wakefield MD for the period mid-1991 to mid-2006 calculated from 1989-based population and household projections. However, the housing requirement in the 1996 RPG has been superseded by new RPG published in October 2001. This includes a revised regional housing requirement estimated from the latest, 1996-based, population and household projections, with allowances for concealed households, dwellings to be demolished in future and a proposed reduction in the level of vacancies in the existing housing stock.
6.4.3 Whilst the scale of housing provision in RPG for the region as a whole is based on the projected trend in the growth in the number of households, a different approach is adopted for individual local authorities. Following the Government's intention to move away from 'predict and provide' towards 'plan, monitor and manage' when planning for additional housing, RPG proposes that the housing requirement for each strategic planning authority should be informed by:
  • the key objectives and strategic themes set out in Chapter 3 of RPG, the housing objectives set out in paragraph 6.3 of RPG, and the locational principles of the regional spatial strategy set out in RPG Policy P1;
  • 1996-based household projections;
  • needs of the regional economy;
  • capacity of urban areas;
  • environmental considerations;
  • capacity of existing and planned infrastructure.
(RPG 2001 paragraph 6.13)
 
6.4.4 RPG proposes that provision be made in Wakefield District to achieve an annual average addition to the housing stock of 950 dwellings per annum during the period 1998-2016, equivalent to 9,500 for the period 1996-2006. This is well above the trend figure for the growth in the number of households between 1991 and 2016 from the 1996 household projections (480 per annum), but it is in line with the average level of housebuilding in the district during the period 1986 to 1999. The Council proposes to adopt the figure of 9,500 additional dwellings for the current UDP.
 
 
H1 PROVISION IS MADE IN THE PLAN FOR APPROXIMATELY 9,500 DWELLINGS IN THE PERIOD 1996-2006.
 
6.4.5 It should be noted that all proposals for residential development will also be subject to Environment, Transport and Open Land policies in addition to those included within this Chapter.
6.4.6 The original UDP made provision for 17,500 new houses to be built, 1,167 per year. Between April 1986 and December 1999 13,737 dwellings had been completed at an average annual rate of 999, well short of that provided for. Policy H1 above provides for an average building rate of 950 new homes per annum to meet the need of new housing until 2006. The Council will monitor the level of housebuilding in the District and the supply of land for housing to ensure that the supply remains sufficient to meet identified needs in the context of the UDP's development strategy and the Government's sustainability objectives. However, as almost all new dwellings will continue to be built by the private sector or registered social landlords, mainly housing associations, the Council has little control over the future rate of house-building and whether the number of houses built in the period of the current Plan will be sufficient to meet the identified need.
6.4.7 The Plan seeks to cater for the genuine housing needs of those who wish to live and work in the District. The Council is anxious not to encourage a "snowballing" effect where house building leads to inward migration which is then used as the basis for further land releases which in turn encourages further inward migration. The 'plan, monitor manage' approach to housing provision, based on an up to date assessment of urban capacity rather than replicating past trends, enables this problem to be avoided. Housing need estimates will be monitored and the amount of land available for new housing will be reviewed in the light of new evidence about population change, the growth in households, changes in the dwelling stock and rates of house-building, as well as information about urban capacity.
6.4.8 Before considering the need to allocate new land to meet the housing requirement in Policy H1 a number of other sources of new housing must be taken into account. A substantial part of the 9,500 requirement will be met from dwellings already completed and through existing commitments in the form of unimplemented planning permissions for housing and land allocated for housing in the original UDP which is still undeveloped but is likely to be developed before mid-2006 and complies with the latest guidance in PPG3.
6.4.9 Between mid-1996 and the end of 1999 4,100 new dwellings were completed in the District, made up of new building and conversions. At the end of 1999 2,896 dwellings on sites of 0.4 hectares or more had the benefit of planning permission, including 556 of which were under construction. In addition, existing housing allocations in the original UDP still undeveloped and without a planning permission were sufficient to accommodate a further 624 houses. These figures are shown in the table in paragraph 6.4.18.
6.4.10 The above figures take account of the findings of the Joint Housing Land Study which assessed the availability and capacity of individual sites. On some sites allocated for housing in the original Plan the number of dwellings which are likely to be built has been reduced as a result of the Study whilst others have been excluded altogether as they are unlikely to be developed by 2006. Following the publication of PPG3, the suitability of all sites which are allocated for housing in the original Plan or only have the benefit of an outline planning permission, has been reassessed in the light of the priority for developing sites set out in the guidance. As a result, all greenfield sites in these two categories have been discounted from the existing land supply. Greenfield sites with full planing permission are included in the table in paragraph 6.4.18 since development of these sites can proceed without the need for further approval.
6.4.11 Sites of less than 0.4 ha. were considered too small to be shown individually in the original UDP. This principle is continued in the current Plan. In addition, despite best efforts to identify in the Plan all sites over 0.4 ha. which are likely to become available for housing during the plan period, many unidentified sites continue to receive planning permission. Together these small and unidentified sites are generally referred to as "windfall" sites.
6.4.12 Government guidance (Revision of PPG3, published March 2000) recognises the importance of windfall sites and states that, when assessing the need for additional land allocations, development plans should make an allowance for the contribution which different types of windfall site are expected to make to the overall supply of housing during the Plan period. The allowance should be based on past trends and likely future potential as assessed in an urban capacity study. An allowance should only be made for windfalls on brownfield sites. PPG3 identifies the conversion of buildings from other uses to housing as an important source which also adds to the available dwelling stock and should be allowed for.
6.4.13 The original Plan assumed that windfall sites and conversions would contribute 275 dwellings per annum to the supply of new housing. This figure was based on guidance in Annex B to the 1992 version of PPG3 about assessing the availability of a 5yr. land supply. It stated that an allowance may be made for small windfall sites of less than 0.4 ha. and for unidentified sites in the 0.4 - 1.0 hectare size range, but no allowance should be made for sites in excess of 1.0 ha. as they are more unpredictable.
6.4.14 Monitoring of development shows that the number of houses arising from these sources has averaged 382 per annum between October 1987 and the end of 1999, 39% higher than allowed for in the original UDP. The Revision of PPG3 makes no reference to a size threshold when allowing for future windfalls but the allowance must relate only to brownfield sites. Building on windfall sites of more than 1.0 ha. has averaged 177 per annum during this same period. The total number of dwellings provided on all windfall sites each year, therefore, has averaged 559, The number of dwellings built on all brownfield windfall sites, including conversions, during 1998 and 1999, the only years for which information is available, has averaged 410. This represents 58% of all houses completed on windfall sites in these two years. The total is made up as follows:
 
WINDFALL HOUSING COMPLETED ON BROWNFIELD SITES ANNUAL AVERAGE JAN. 1998 - DEC. 1999
New build sites less than 0.4 ha.
118
New build sites 0.4 ha. to 1.0 ha.
155
Conversions to residential use.
57
Total
330
 
New build sites more than 1.0 ha
80
Total
410
 
6.4.15 Some studies suggest that the number of windfall developments is likely to diminish in future as the supply of suitable sites is exhausted. Monitoring shows that there is no sign of this happening in Wakefield. Windfalls vary from year to year but there is no discernible downward trend. The majority of windfall sites arise within existing urban areas. Government guidance relating to sustainable development emphasises the need to provide housing in urban locations, to reuse previously developed land to encourage conversions to housing in urban areas, all of which are likely to maintain the supply of windfall sites and increase the number of buildings being converted to residential use.
6.4.16 One potential source of new housing is underused and vacant floorspace over shops and business premises, which is no longer required in connection with the ground floor use, particularly within town centres. In addition to providing new housing its reuse would help revitalise town centres and conserve and improve the built environment.
6.4.17 The Plan supports the Government's approach to the reuse of previously developed land and it is expected that the supply of new housing from brownfield windfall sites and conversions will remain high. It is assumed that together they will contribute an average of 230 dwellings per year for the rest of the plan period. This figure is arrived at by applying the average percentage of windfall housing built on brownfield land in 1998-1999 (58%) to the long term average rate of windfall housing completions (559), and discounting the result by 30% to allow for the fact that a number of what would otherwise be large windfall sites are specifically allocated for housing in the Plan.
6.4.18 The table below indicates the number of dwellings which need to be accommodated on new sites identified in the current Plan taking account of the sources covered in paragraphs 6.4.9 to 6.4.17 above. Research has shown that when estimating the supply of housing from existing sites a discount of 10% should be applied to the figures to allow for sites which do not come forward for development. The table indicates the effect of applying this discount to existing commitments, other than dwellings already under construction. No discount is applied to future windfalls as this is already an assumed rate.
 
 
NEED FOR NEW HOUSING LAND (Dwellings)
 
(-10%)
Total dwellings required (Policy H1)
9,500
Less:
- Dwellings completed mid-1996 to end 1999
4,100
- Dwellings under construction or with planning permission end 1999
2,896
(2,662)
- Capacity of sites allocated in the original UDP still undeveloped & no planning
permission end 1999
624
(562)
- Allowance for future windfall sites and conversions start 2000 to mid 2006 ( 230
x 6.5yrs.)
1,495
Dwellings to be accommodated on new sites in the current UDP
385
(681)
 
6.4.19 Proposals are put forward in paragraph 6.4.47 and the Housing Annex to accommodate the outstanding requirement of 681 new dwellings. The proposed allocations are of a scale which will encourage regeneration in parts of the District but will not, it is hoped, lead to significant inward migration and increased competition for jobs or long distance commuting.
6.4.20 As well as ensuring that sufficient housing land is available to meet the identified needs of the District one of the main objectives of the Plan is to provide for a range of choice of affordable housing within the District. The sites allocated for housing have been identified to provide as wide a variety as possible in terms of their size and type, within the context of the Plan's overall development strategy and the Government's priorities for meeting the need of new housing. It is intended that such a range will be attractive to all development agencies and builders irrespective of their size. The availability of small sites in each area enables new development to be spread throughout the District. Major sites are particularly attractive to the volume builders who make a substantial contribution to the supply of new housing.
6.4.21 PPG3 refers to the need to avoid low density housing and to raise the overall density of development. Between mid-1991 and the end of 1999 housing development in Wakefield District on sites of 0.4 ha. and above averaged 28 dwellings per hectare. On brownfield sites the average was 32 dwellings per ha. In order to make best use of resources the Council will encourage housing development at the highest density compatible with the nature and location of the site, the type of development proposed and the standards set out in its Residential Design Guide adopted as supplementary planning guidance in November 1996. In general, new housing should be built at a minimum net residential density, as defined in PPG3, of 30 dwellings per ha. High density housing, up to 50 dwellings per ha. or more, will be appropriate on sites close to town centres, community facilities, other services and public transport routes where there is a need for housing for the elderly and single people in particular. In appropriate locations the Council will accept reduced or no parking provision subject to accessibility or parking requirements being catered for by alternative means (see paragraphs 4.6.30-32). Lower densities may be appropriate in more sensitive settings, but these will be very much the exception and will need to be justified by special circumstances. The following policy will apply:
 
 
H18 PLANNING PERMISSION FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT WILL ONLY BE GRANTED WHERE THE NET RESIDENTIAL DENSITY (AS DEFINED IN PPG3 (MARCH 2000)) IS AT LEAST 30 DWELLINGS PER HECTARE, EXCEPT IN SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES WHERE A LOWER DENSITY MAY BE JUSTIFIED BECAUSE OF EITHER;
  i) THE CHARACTER OF THE SITE ITSELF; OR
  ii) THE CHARACTER OF THE SURROUNDING AREA; OR
  iii) THE NEED TO PRESERVE THE AMENITIES OF EXISTING OR FUTURE RESIDENTS.
  HOUSING DEVELOPMENTS OF BETWEEN 30 AND 50 DWELLINGS PER HECTARE NET WILL BE ENCOURAGED; AND GREATER INTENSITY OF DEVELOPMENT WILL BE SOUGHT IN WAKEFIELD CITY CENTRE, OTHER TOWN CENTRES OF THE DISTRICT (AS DEFINED ON THE PROPOSALS MAP) AND CLOSE TO MAIN PUBLIC TRANSPORT ROUTES.
 
6.4.22 The Government has stated its wish to see the creation of mixed and balanced communities (PPG3). To achieve this it is desirable that a range of house types is provided within individual developments, especially on the larger sites. Though it would not be appropriate to specify the types of housing for each site in the Plan, except where an element of affordable housing is needed, developers will be expected to take account of the changing composition of households, particularly the projected increase in the number of single person households, when planning their developments. Guidance will be given on the mix of house types through the preparation of Planning Briefs and through negotiations with developers. The following general policy H3 will apply.
 
 
H3 THE COUNCIL WILL SEEK THE PROVISION OF A MIX OF HOUSING, IN TERMS OF SIZE, TYPE AND AFFORDABILITY OF DWELLING, ON INDIVIDUAL DEVELOPMENTS THROUGHOUT THE DISTRICT TO MEET THE FULL RANGE OF HOUSING NEED. WHERE THERE IS A SHORTAGE OF ACCOMMODATION FOR SINGLE AND TWO PERSON HOUSEHOLDS PROVISION SHOULD BE MADE IN HOUSING SCHEMES IN TOWN CENTRES AND IN OTHER SCHEMES OF 25 DWELLINGS OR MORE. SUPPLEMENTARY PLANNING GUIDANCE AND DEVELOPMENT BRIEFS WILL BE PROVIDED AS REQUIRED.
   
 
Affordable Housing
6.4.23 Many households cannot find accommodation to meet their needs at a price they can afford. Some, such as the elderly, the disabled and others with special needs require specially designed housing, sometimes with support provided. The scale and types of need in different parts of the District are demonstrated in the Council's Housing Needs Survey and are reviewed regularly in its annual Housing Investment Strategy.
6.4.24 The Government published Circular 6/98 in April 1998 in which it advises that where they can demonstrate a lack of affordable housing to meet local needs based on up-to-date surveys and other data, local authorities can include policies in their land use plans aimed at increasing the stock of affordable housing. The circular also advises them to be specific in defining affordable housing and in setting out their requirements for its provision.
6.4.25 The Council intends to adopt the definition of affordable housing used in Circular 6/98, which states, "the terms 'affordable housing' and 'affordable homes' are used to encompass both low-cost market and subsidised housing (irrespective of tenure, ownership - whether exclusive or shared - or financial arrangements) that will be available to people who cannot afford to rent or buy houses generally available on the open market."
6.4.26 The Housing Needs Survey, carried out in Wakefield District in 1998, considered the relationship between local incomes and market house prices and rents and adopted a 30% share of income spent on housing to determine whether properties in different market sectors are affordable. The survey found that 62% of households wanting to move into or within Wakefield District in the following three years would not be able to afford general market housing and would require affordable housing. The scale of need in different parts of the district was compared with the available stock of affordable housing. In some areas there is a mismatch between the type and size of dwelling required and the composition of the existing stock, with an oversupply of family housing and a shortage of housing for single people and couples. Shortages of affordable housing are apparent in Wakefield, Ossett, Horbury and parts of Castleford and Pontefract, with local need for specific types of affordable housing elsewhere throughout the District. The Housing Investment Strategy identifies a need for a minimum of 3,204 affordable dwellings in the period 1999/2002. This compares with a total of 983 new affordable dwellings built between mid-1991 and the end of 1997. The scale of need is continually under review as further research is undertaken.
6.4.27 The Council works with registered social landlords to implement an annual programme of affordable and social housing making use of the Council's own land where possible. In some areas the identified need for affordable housing exceeds the total number of affordable dwellings likely to be achieved from public investment. In these circumstances, working within the guidance provided in Circular 6/98 and PPG3, the Council will require an element of affordable housing to be provided in suitable private sector developments of market housing.
 
 
H4 WHERE THERE IS A DEMONSTRATED LACK OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING TO MEET LOCAL NEEDS, THE COUNCIL WILL REQUIRE THE PROVISION OF AN ELEMENT OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING IN HOUSING SCHEMES ON SUITABLE SITES. THE NEED FOR AFFORDABLE HOUSING WILL BE ONE OF THE MATERIAL CONSIDERATIONS WHICH THE COUNCIL WILL TAKE INTO ACCOUNT WHEN DETERMINING PLANNING APPLICATIONS FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT.
  THE FOLLOWING CRITERIA WILL BE TAKEN INTO ACCOUNT WHEN DETERMINING APPROPRIATE SCHEMES:
  i) THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT IS ON A SITE OF 1 HECTARE OR MORE OR FOR 25 OR MORE DWELLINGS;
  ii) IN SETTLEMENTS OF FEWER THAN 3,000 PEOPLE THE PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT IS ON A SITE OF 0.5 HECTARE OR MORE OR FOR 15 OR MORE DWELLINGS;
  iii) THE SITE IS CLOSE TO LOCAL SERVICES AND FACILITIES AND HAS ACCESS TO PUBLIC TRANSPORT;
  iv) WHETHER THERE ARE UNUSUAL COSTS ASSOCIATED WITH THE DEVELOPMENT.
  THE COUNCIL WILL SEEK TO ENSURE THAT:
  v) THE AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROVIDED CATERS FOR THE TYPE OF NEED IDENTIFIED IN ITS HOUSING NEEDS SURVEY AND HOUSING INVESTMENT STRATEGY AND;
  vi) SECURE ARRANGEMENTS ARE IN PLACE TO RETAIN THE BENEFITS OF AFFORDABILITY FOR INITIAL AND SUBSEQUENT OCCUPIERS.
   
6.4.28 The Council considers that a number of sites allocated for housing development in the Plan should include an element of affordable housing. These sites are listed in the Housing Annex and more details about each site are included in the Community Area proposals in Volumes 3, 4, & 5 of the UDP. In addition policy H4 will apply to sites not allocated for housing in the UDP on which applications for planning permission for residential development are made.
6.4.29 Where there is a demonstrable need for affordable housing and the site or proposal meets the criteria in policy H4 the Council will negotiate to achieve between 15% and 25% of the total number of dwellings on site as affordable, unless the need would be met by a smaller proportion. In such cases the lower figure would be the target. Developers whose proposals meet the criteria of policy H4 are encouraged to contact the Council at an early stage of planning their development with a view to negotiating an element of affordable housing. Factors to be considered in the negotiations are:
  • the scale and nature of housing need in the area;
  • the potential supply of affordable housing on other sites in the locality;
  • the suitability of the locality in terms of proximity to services, amenities and public transport;
  • the cost of developing a particular site.
6.4.30 Developers are not precluded from providing affordable housing on sites which are below the size threshold set out above, and the Council encourages developers to consider such provision, where they think it feasible and appropriate, in consultation with the Head of Housing. Site development costs to be taken into account include those arising from removing structures or contamination associated with a previous use and off-site infrastructure works required as a condition of a planning permission, which have not already been reflected in the price paid for the land.
 
 
Securing Affordable Housing & Controlling Occupancy
6.4.31 Where affordable housing is required, whether in urban or rural locations, Circular 6/98 advises local authorities to have in place arrangements for securing affordable housing, initially and in perpetuity, and criteria governing eligibility for occupancy.
6.4.32 There are a number of mechanisms available to local authorities for securing affordable housing. These include:
  • Covenants on the sale of the Council's own land;
  • Conditions attached to planning permissions;
  • Planning obligations.
The Council will make use of these mechanisms as appropriate where an element of affordable housing is required.
 
6.4.33 There may be cases where the Council and the developer both consider that, on particular sites where a requirement for an element of affordable housing would be appropriate, it is nonetheless preferable that a financial or other contribution should be made towards the provision of the element of affordable housing on another site (whether via new build or conversions) within the District. In appropriate circumstances the Council will make use of planning obligations which either:
  • allow the developer to make a contribution towards the cost of providing affordable housing on a different site, only on the signing of contracts to provide the affordable housing element; or
  • include a covenant to the effect that a sum or sums paid by the developer to the local planning authority for the purpose of meeting or contributing towards the costs of affordable housing on a different site, shall be repaid to the developer on or by a specified date if such sums have not been used for that purpose.
6.4.34 Decisions about what types of affordable housing to build on a particular site should reflect local housing need and site suitability and will be a matter for discussion and agreement amongst the parties involved. It will normally be appropriate to create a mix of affordable housing, though the overriding consideration should be that the provision contributes to satisfying local need.
6.4.35 There are a number of ways in which occupancy of affordable housing can be controlled, either initially or in perpetuity. These include:
  • involvement of a registered social landlord (RSL)
  • conditions attached to a planning permission
  • planning obligations
6.4.36 Circular 6/98 advises that an effective way of controlling occupancy is for a registered social landlord to be responsible for the management of the affordable housing. The Council endorses this approach. In these circumstances it will not normally impose additional occupancy controls. However, on rural exceptions sites the Council may use conditions or planning obligations to ensure there are adequate occupancy controls to reserve the housing in question for local needs in perpetuity. It is unacceptable, in planning terms, for affordable housing on rural exceptions sites to be sold on the open market.
6.4.37 Where a registered social landlord is not involved, conditions and obligations will be used as appropriate in each relevant case, but will not normally be used to control matters such as tenure, ownership or the rent or purchase price payable by the prospective occupiers. Where measures to control occupancy are included in conditions or planning obligations the following criteria will be used to identify preferred occupants of affordable housing:
  • household income below a set level based on the New Earnings Survey;
  • households living in overcrowded or unsatisfactory accommodation;
  • households living in the locality for a specified number of years;
  • households with a member working or being educated locally;
  • households with close relatives living locally;
  • households qualifying for the type of housing provided by virtue of their age.
A flexible approach will be taken to ensure that properties do not remain vacant.
6.4.38 Further guidance on affordable housing will be provided through the preparation of Supplementary Planning Guidance, as necessary.
 
 
Low Cost Housing in Rural Areas
6.4.39 There are sometimes particular difficulties in securing an adequate supply of affordable housing for local needs in rural areas where demand has driven up house prices. A supply of affordable housing may be necessary to ensure the continuing viability of small communities. In these circumstances the Government has acknowledged in PPG3 that it may be appropriate to release small sites which would not otherwise be allocated for housing within or adjoining existing settlements to provide low cost housing for local needs. Sites of this type are to be exceptions to housing policies to meet general needs and are additional to the general housing land provision in development plans.
6.4.40 The problem of affordable housing in rural areas occurs mainly in Southern England but there may be occasions where local shortages occur in Wakefield District arising from policies of restriction on development. This is likely to be confined to small rural settlements in the Green Belt where limited residential infilling is acceptable under Policy OL16:
East Hardwick
Midgley
North Elmsall
Old Snydale
Warmfield
Wentbridge
Wragby
The need for affordable housing to be provided as an exception to general housing policies should be established by means of a local needs survey which has been agreed with the Council. It is proposed that the following policy should apply:
 
 
H5 IN EXCEPTIONAL CASES IN RURAL AREAS SITES MAY BE RELEASED FOR PROVEN LOCAL NEEDS AS AN EXCEPTION TO NORMAL POLICIES RELATING TO GENERAL HOUSING PROVISION.
   
6.4.41 Policy OL17 relating to the provision of dwellings for agricultural workers in the Green Belt is included in the Open Land policies of the Plan. In all other circumstances the need for low cost affordable housing is not sufficient to justify the building of isolated dwellings within the Green Belt.
   
 
The Location of New Development
6.4.42 As noted in paragraph 6.4.10 sites which were allocated for housing in the original UDP and remain substantially undeveloped have been reassessed in the light of the priority for developing sites set out in PPG3. As a result, all allocated greenfield sites, where there is not already a commitment to develop the site, have been discounted from the existing land supply. The remaining originally allocated previously developed sites are carried forward to the current Plan where, according to the 1997 Joint Housing Land Availability Study, development is likely to take place by 2006. The sites allocated for housing in the current Plan also include significant windfall sites where planning permission for housing has been granted since the original UDP was adopted, a significant part of the site remains to be developed and it is now considered appropriate to make a formal allocation for housing. Individual sites in these categories are listed in the Housing Annex and more details about each site are included in the Community Area proposals in Volumes 3, 4 & 5 of the UDP.
6.4.43 Where applicable, the housing capacity of each site in the Annex has been determined by a planning permission or through the Joint Housing Land Study. In the case of 6 sites a density of 30 dwellings per hectare has been used, reflecting Policy H18, except where known constraints indicate that a lower capacity should apply. On this basis the number of houses which can be accommodated on 'Original' and 'Windfall' housing allocations together in the Annex is 3,212. This is less than the total of existing commitments shown in paragraph 6.4.18, 3,520 (2,896 + 624) because not all windfall commitments have been identified as housing allocations in the Plan.
6.4.44 When identifying additional sites to accommodate the requirement for 681 new dwellings, identified in paragraph 6.4.18 above, account has been taken of the strategic objectives of the UDP that housing should assist the regeneration of those parts of the District suffering deprivation.
6.4.45 New housing allocations have been identified to complement existing and new employment opportunities in order to provide the opportunity for people to live close to their place of work and so reduce the need to travel. A major concern has been to avoid encroachment into the Green Belt. Government guidance (PPG's 2 & 12) states that Green Belt boundaries should endure for a longer period than most other policies in a development plan and should only be changed in exceptional circumstances. The aims of providing a mix of housing sites and of protecting land used for recreational and amenity purposes within urban areas have also been taken into account.
6.4.46 Paragraph 30 of PPG3 sets out the sequence to be followed when identifying sites to be allocated for housing in development plans:
  • firstly, the re-use of previously developed land and buildings in urban areas identified by urban capacity studies;
  • secondly, urban extensions;
  • finally, new development around nodes in good public transport corridors.
with a presumption that previously developed sites should be developed before greenfield. Paragraph 31 lists the criteria to be used to assess the suitability of individual sites. Policy H2 of RPG proposes a more detailed sequential approach to the release of housing land. Subject to the relative sustainability of different locations, the sequence is:
1 urban brownfield land and conversions;
2 infill within urban areas, subject to maintaining standards of greenspace;
3 development on the periphery of main urban settlements accessible to services and jobs by public transport - brownfield before greenfield;
4 development on the periphery of market and coalfield towns within good quality public transport corridors - brownfield before greenfield;
5 other development that supports the regional spatial strategy, which can be well integrated with an existing settlement and can provide good public transport links to a wide range of employment and services.
Though PPG3 and RPG were published after the process for identifying sites in the Plan was drawn up it is considered that the criteria listed below reflect the priorities set out in the two documents.
The following criteria have been used to select new housing sites for inclusion in the Plan:
1) Has there been a significant change in land use on the site, or adjacent to it, since the original UDP was adopted?
Will altering the site's allocation demonstrably;
2) accord with government guidance on sustainability and development in the Green Belt?
3) allow development to commence before 2006?
4) address a known need or be consistent with the strategy and priorities of any other agency, policy, or programme operation in the District?
5) strengthen the local economy by virtue of benefit to a specific location, business sector or major employer?
6) create employment opportunities for the most deprived communities?
7) sustain and enhance local town centres?
8) result in the re-use and reclamation of derelict or redundant land or buildings?
9) minimise the need for travel or encourage public transport, cycling and walking?
10) maximise the use of existing infrastructure?
11) enhance or protect designated aspects of the District's open character, heritage, archaeology, built environment, landscape, agricultural land, mineral deposits, biodiversity, habitats or wildlife?
 
 
6.4.47 The sites which have been selected as a result of this process and are included as new housing allocations in the Plan to meet the need identified in paragraph 6.4.18 are also listed in the Annex. More details about each site can be found in the Community Area proposals in Volumes 3, 4, & 5 of the UDP. Based on development proposals where these are known, and using a density of 30 dwellings per hectare in other cases, it is estimated that new housing sites can accommodate 1,909 dwellings, considerably more than the requirement for 681, and enough to allow for individual sites not coming forward. It has only been necessary to consider sites within existing urban areas which have the highest priority in terms of PPG3 and fall in the first two priority categories of RPG Policy H2 in order to meet the requirement for additional housing land. The list of sites in the Annex includes a number of greenfield allocations in the original Plan which were excluded from the sites carried forward in the Review, (see paragraph 6.4.10), but have been reinstated as 'new' housing allocations on the basis of the sequential approach to site selection set out above. The Annex excludes dwellings to be provided on the proposed Special Policy Area at the former Woolley Colliery site (ref. SWR 47). Because of this site's proximity to Barnsley District it is considered that housebuilding here will have an impact on Barnsley's housing market rather than contributing to meeting Wakefield's housing requirement.
6.4.48 Government guidelines propose that nationally 60% of all new housing should take place on land which has been developed previously ("brownfield" land) by 2008. Paragraph 6.2.6 above notes that RPG proposes a regional target of 60% and a provisional target for Wakefield MD of 61%. This figure will need to be reviewed as information from an urban capacity study becomes available. 42% of the dwellings on sites allocated for housing in the Plan are on previously developed sites. For new sites allocated for the first time in the current UDP the figure is 100%. The overall figure reflects that fact that the original UDP was drawn up before the present emphasis on the reuse of brownfield land became part of Government policy. Most of the larger sites in the original UDP were greenfield and several, where development is proceeding or is already committed, still appear in the current Plan. It is anticipated that, taking into account future windfalls, the proportion of housing built on brownfield land will be nearing the provisional figure in RPG by the end of the current Plan but much will depend on the outcome of the urban capacity study to identify the potential for further housing on brownfield land. Despite the fact that there are large amounts of brownfield land in the District, much of it is not suitable for housing. This is reflected in the results from phase 1 of the National Land Use Database.
6.4.49 It is considered that the criteria in paragraph 6.4.46 together with those in paragraphs 30 to 32 of PPG3 and Policy H2 of RPG should also be applied to proposals for residential development on land which is not specifically allocated for this purpose in the Plan. In these cases Policy H6 is to apply. The policy is intended to give guidance about where new "windfall" housing will be acceptable. The criteria in Policy H6 are not intended to carry any order of priority, as all the conditions need to be satisfied.
 
 
H6 PROPOSALS FOR RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT, INCLUDING THOSE FOR THE RENEWAL OF A PREVIOUS PLANNING PERMISSION, SHOULD:
  a) BE LOCATED WITHIN OR FORM AN EXTENSION TO AN EXISTING SETTLEMENT OR URBAN AREA; AND
  b) COMPRISE THE REUSE OF PREVIOUSLY DEVELOPED LAND OR THE CONVERSION OF AN EXISTING BUILDING; OR
    CONSTITUTE INFILL WITHIN AN EXISTING SETTLEMENT OR URBAN AREA, SUBJECT TO THE NEED TO PROTECT URBAN GREENSPACE IN ACCORDANCE WITH POLICY L3.
  IN ALL CASES PROPOSALS SHOULD:
  i) BE COMPATIBLE WITH THE SETTLEMENT'S SIZE, CHARACTER, LOCATION, SETTING AND AMENITIES; AND
  ii) CONFORM WITH POLICIES IN THE PLAN WHICH SAFEGUARD LAND FOR OTHER PURPOSES; AND
  iii) BE IN ACCORDANCE WITH TRANSPORT POLICIES RELATING TO NEW DEVELOPMENT, PARTICULARLY POLICY T2, IN TAKING PROPER ACCOUNT OF TRANSPORT AND LAND USE RELATIONSHIPS; AND
  iv) NOT EXCEED THE CAPACITY OF EXISTING OR COMMITTED INFRASTRUCTURE AND COMMUNITY FACILITIES AND SERVICES; AND
  v) PROVIDE A HIGH STANDARD OF HOUSING ENVIRONMENT AND BUILDING DESIGN.
  IN ALL CASES SUBJECT TO LOCAL PLANNING, TRANSPORT AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS.
 
6.4.50 These criteria reflect fundamental planning practise and principles. Development within the existing limits of a settlement which meets the criteria in Policy H6 will usually be supported particularly where the conversion of an existing building or the reuse of derelict or underused land and buildings is involved. Developments will be encouraged which have good access to public transport and enable people to walk or cycle to local shopping and other facilities. Urban infill on greenfield sites may also be acceptable but is also important to safeguard urban land which has existing or potential amenity and / or recreational value. Such action will assist the process of 'greening' the urban environment. The aim is to locate new residential development within existing settlements and urban areas. The scale of any new development should be consistent with the settlement's size, character, location and setting and should not damage the amenity of an existing residential area. Otherwise existing communities could be adversely affected and pressure for additional services and community facilities, many of which are provided by public agencies, will be generated. Proposals for development forming extensions to existing settlements will generally be acceptable where they involve previously developed land or buildings. They will also need to be consistent with other policies in the Plan such as those for safeguarding the Green Belt and agricultural land and protecting the character of historic buildings and Conservation Areas. Other than on infill sites, development on greenfield land will only be acceptable where an existing greenfield allocation is retained in the Plan. Planning applications for the renewal of a previous permission will be considered in the light of Policy H6 and PPG3 to ensure that they conform to the latest guidance.
6.4.51 The main urban areas and settlements contain the greatest investment in infrastructure and it is important that maximum use is made of both existing and committed investment. One of the most important single elements of this 'social' capital is the transport network, which has a close relationship with land use particularly in terms of the accessibility which is provided to jobs, services and other facilities. Others include the drainage, sewerage, water and communications networks, together with the full range of community facilities and services such as shops, schools, libraries, hospitals and health centres provided in commercial and other readily accessible urban locations. New residential development should be within the capacity of existing or committed infrastructure.
6.4.52 The Council wishes to promote a high standard of housing environment throughout the District and to ensure a consistent approach to the assessment of schemes submitted to the authority. It therefore adopted a Residential Design Guide as supplementary planning guidance in November 1996 which sets out for intending developers the standards and guidelines against which planning applications will be considered. The guide concentrates on the basic elements of successful design in housing layouts and does not seek to restrict the initiatives of architects and designers, indeed it is intended to encourage interest and variety in the design of housing. Further guidance is contained in the Designing out Crime Guide.
 
 
Access to Undeveloped Land
6.4.53 Land needs beyond the Plan period are expected to be assessed in reviews of the UDP. In the past some longer term development opportunities have been severely constrained by lack of access to adjoining land from existing housing areas. Consequently, in the detailed planning of new housing areas consideration will be given to the need to provide access and services capable of accommodating the development of adjoining land . This principle is covered by Policy H8.
 
 
H8 NEW RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENTS, WHICH ADJOIN UNDEVELOPED LAND, SHOULD NOT BE DEVELOPED IN A WAY WHICH PREVENTS THE OPPORTUNITY FOR THE ADJACENT LAND TO BE SUBSEQUENTLY DEVELOPED.
 
 
Open Space in Residential Areas
6.4.54 In seeking to provide sufficient land to meet the housing needs of the District, the Plan recognises the impact that this new development will have on social and community facilities. All new developments should ensure that sufficient recreational open space and other facilities are provided to meet the needs of the development.
 
 
H9 ALL NEW HOUSING DEVELOPMENTS SHOULD PROVIDE FOR OPEN SPACE AND RECREATIONAL FACILITIES WHICH ARE RELATED TO THE SCALE, TYPE AND DENSITY OF DEVELOPMENT, AND TO THE NATURE OF THE SITE AND ITS SURROUNDINGS.
 
6.4.55 The Council's Residential Design Guide sets out minimum standards for the provision of open space within new development. Particular attention will be paid to the location of open space to avoid loss of amenity to adjoining residents and ensure the provision of useable areas of open space.
6.4.56 Major new developments will place a greater load on general recreational facilities, and developers may be expected to include additional facilities within a development (such as the provision of sports pitches) or to make a contribution to the extension of off-site facilities, the need for which arises from the development.
6.4.57 Where supplementary planning guidance or planning briefs are prepared for particular sites, recreational open space and other requirements will be specified in more detail.
   
 
Existing Residential Areas
6.4.58 The District possesses an extensive and varied stock of about 135,500 dwellings from which most of the future housing needs will continue to be met. The future condition of the existing stock will therefore have an important bearing on the quality of life of residents.
6.4.59 The future condition of the housing stock will, however depend on the level of resources available for maintenance and improvement. A failure to maintain and improve the stock at satisfactory levels will have the effect of storing up problems for the future.
6.4.60 The Council places great importance on the maintenance and improvement of the existing stock and has for many years developed and implemented programmes for area improvement of private and public sector housing. The Council's House Condition Survey reveals that over 10% of the existing stock is unfit at present. It is, therefore, important that the scale of these programmes is maintained and if possible increased in future.
6.4.61 The main means of securing area improvements for private sector housing is through Renewal Areas declared under the Local Government and Housing Act 1989. Renewal Areas are likely to extend over a wide area, the area may be the subject of a variety of renewal options and proposals will be comprehensive with non-housing issues being addressed in the preparation of proposals.
6.4.62 The Council declared the first renewal area on 21 November 1990 and a second in September 1992, both in the Smawthorne, Castleford locality. A phased implementation programme is being progressed involving significant emphasis on group repair and community and environmental initiatives. This has had a marked impact on the area and has acted as a catalyst for further private sector investment. Co-ordinated action is leading to housing, environmental and economic regeneration.
6.4.63 The Council continues to re-assess its area improvement programme. The successful implementation of this programme is regarded as crucial to the improvement of the older housing stock. Housing areas which are not considered appropriate for declaration as Renewal Areas may be included within the improvement programme by being identified as non-statutory Priority Areas.
6.4.64 Not all the problems of private sector disrepair can be tackled by area based improvements. These are supported by a range of Council grants designed to achieve improvements to the dwelling stock. Following the Housing Grants Construction & Regeneration Act 1996 priority for grants is given to people with disabilities, those on low incomes living in the worst housing and those living in priority areas.
6.4.65 The Council owns some 38,400 dwellings which are vital in helping to meet the District's needs for affordable and social housing. A significant number of homes are in need of improvement to bring them up to modern standards. It is recognised that to be effective in maintaining the attractiveness of the dwelling stock housing improvements must be complemented by wider improvements to an area. The Council's ability to improve and modernise its housing is severely limited by the availability of funds. It seeks to make best use of funding from Capital Challenge and the Single Regeneration Budget (SRB) to improve the social, economic and physical fabric of its estates.
6.4.66 A District-wide Asset Management Strategy is being developed to address the specific needs of individual communities. The strategy recognises the need to manage decline in areas of low demand as well as addressing need, and is central to the Council's wish to work in partnership with other housing providers in all sectors to improve the District's housing stock.
 
 
H10 THE COUNCIL WILL SEEK TO IMPROVE THE QUALITY OF THE HOUSING STOCK AND THE RESIDENTIAL ENVIRONMENT IN EXISTING HOUSING AREAS, THROUGH THE DECLARATION OF RENEWAL AREAS UNDER THE LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND HOUSING ACT 1989, IN APPROPRIATE CIRCUMSTANCES, AND THROUGH SUPPORTING SIMILAR IMPROVEMENT INITIATIVES.
 
6.4.67 Certain existing housing areas are subject to express policies, shown on the Proposals Maps, which contain a presumption against new housing development or redevelopment - e.g., Employment Zones and Green Belt. Except for these areas the majority of existing housing areas are not covered by any notation on the Proposals Maps and are expected to remain in their existing use. Within these areas ancillary uses will be accepted provided that they are compatible with the primary residential use.
 
 
H11 EXISTING AREAS PREDOMINANTLY IN RESIDENTIAL USE WILL REMAIN IN THEIR PRESENT USE. THE INTRODUCTION OF NON-RESIDENTIAL USES INTO THESE AREAS WILL ONLY BE ACCEPTED WHERE THEY ARE COMPATIBLE WITH THE PRIMARY HOUSING USE, AND WHERE THEY PROVIDE LOCAL COMMUNITY FACILITIES OR SERVICES.
 
6.4.68 In order to comply with H11, development, changes of use, or redevelopment schemes, should observe normal planning requirements so as to cause no loss of amenity to existing residential properties, and no traffic /transport difficulties. A further consideration will be the extent to which they are directly related to the housing functions of the area in which they are located; that is, whether they provide a service or employment to the immediate area.
6.4.69 Older housing areas are where the majority of Houses in Multiple Occupation (HMOs) are found. A survey undertaken by the Chief Housing Officer in 1995/96 showed that there are about 335 HMOs in the District, the majority of them in the Wakefield area. There has been a reduction in the number of bed-sits and an increase in the number of flats in line with occupants' needs since the last survey in 1989. The Head of Housing has a duty to carry out a risk assessment of HMOs to ensure that they meet statutory standards with a view to protecting the health, safety and welfare of the occupants. There is a demand for relatively cheap, small, rented accommodation which exceeds supply. HMOs tend to fill this gap and perform a useful role in the housing market providing they are properly managed and maintained up to the required standards. The Council seeks to enable the supply of good standard HMO accommodation to grow and aims to bring about improvements through negotiations with landlords, taking enforcement action where necessary.
6.4.70 From a planning point of view, the change of use of a dwelling house to a house in multiple occupation will often require planning permission. HMOs can have considerable impact on neighbouring residential properties and on parking facilities in an area. Whilst not wishing to place unnecessary restrictions on a potential source of housing it is important that these problems are properly taken into account when planning applications for HMOs are being determined. Uncontrolled concentrations of HMOs in unsuitable properties can cause considerable disruption to other local residents as well as providing sub-standard accommodation for the occupants of HMOs themselves. Therefore it is proposed that Policy H13 will apply.
 
 
H13 PROPOSALS FOR THE MULTIPLE OCCUPATION OF DWELLINGS WITHIN EXISTING RESIDENTIAL AREAS WILL BE CONSIDERED HAVING REGARD TO:
  i) A DEMONSTRATED LOCAL NEED FOR THE TYPE OF ACCOMMODATION TO BE PROVIDED;
  ii) THE INTERNAL STANDARDS OF THE PROPERTY BEING SUITABLE FOR MULTIPLE OCCUPATION;
  iii) APPROPRIATE OFF OR ON STREET PARKING BEING AVAILABLE;
  iv) THE IMPACT ON NEIGHBOURING RESIDENTIAL PROPERTIES, AND WHETHER THIS CAN BE AMELIORATED BY SUITABLE CONDITIONS;
  v) THE OBJECTIVE OF AVOIDING AN EXCESSIVE CONCENTRATION OF HMO's WITHIN A PARTICULAR LOCALITY.
 
 
Accommodation for Gypsies
6.4.71 Section 6 of the Caravans Sites Act 1968, which required Local Authorities to provide adequate accommodation for gypsies was repealed by the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994. DoE Circular 1/94 - Gypsy Sites and Planning, encourages local authorities to consider gypsies' accommodation needs when preparing or amending their development plans. The Council are meeting a demonstrated need by providing a thirty eight pitch gypsy site at Heath which was completed in 1992.
6.4.72 It is considered that the site at Heath provides sufficient accommodation to meet the foreseeable needs of the gypsy population of the district. However, planning applications for additional gypsy sites will be considered on their merits taking into account relevant policies in the UDP and other material considerations. The Council will continue to take action to expedite removal of illegally camped gypsies from unauthorised sites.
 
 
Accessible Housing
6.4.73 The DETR has published a revised version of Part M of the Building Regulations which extends the requirements for accessibility to new dwellings. These come into force on 25 October 1999.
6.4.74 The changes to Part M require that reasonable provision should be made in and around dwellings (including any purpose-built student living accommodation);
  • so that disabled people can reach the principal, or a suitable alternative entrance to the dwelling from the point of access;
  • for access for disabled persons into and within the principal storey of the dwelling, and
  • for sanitary accommodation at no higher storey than the principal storey.
6.4.75 The Council welcomes the changes to the regulations and expects them to assist in securing its objective of ensuring that all new dwellings are constructed to mobility standards having regard to the characteristics of each site.
6.4.76 The particular design features are desirable and convenient for any potential occupier, not just disabled people. They also address the issue of `visitability' so that in most new dwellings wheelchair users are not barred from visiting friends and relatives.
6.4.77 While welcoming the changes to Part M of the Building Regulations the Council recognises that they are not intended to facilitate full independent living for all disabled people. It is estimated that about 2-3% of all people with disabilities are permanently confined to wheelchairs and the Council would like to see a proportion of new dwellings built to accommodate their needs. Policy H16 will apply to proposals on suitable sites.
 
 
H16 IN DEVELOPMENTS OF MORE THAN 10 DWELLINGS, WHICH ARE CLOSE TO SHOPS AND SERVICES, THE COUNCIL WILL NEGOTIATE TO ACHIEVE A PROPORTION OF DWELLINGS TO BE DESIGNED SPECIFICALLY FOR, OR TO BE CAPABLE OF EASY ADAPTATION TO, WHEELCHAIR STANDARDS. PARKING PROVISION SHOULD BE MADE ADJACENT TO THE DWELLING.
   
6.4.78 In the above policy `close to' is generally taken to be within 800 metres of shops and services.
6.4.79 With regard to wheelchair housing, the standards the Council will adopt are based on those in the DoE's HDD Occasional Paper 2/75 `Wheelchair Housing'. The principal features required at construction stage, in order to permit adaptation to full wheelchair standard at a later date are:
  • a level or slightly ramped approach and flush threshold at the main entrance;
  • internal planning for wheelchair manoeuvre in all principal rooms, with 1200mm passageways and 900mm doorsets, or sliding doors;
  • a downstairs bedroom and bathroom or, in a two storey house, a downstairs WC and a straight-flight staircase suitable for the provision of a stair or through-floor lift;
  • bathrooms and toilets large enough to permit lateral transfer from wheelchair to WC/bath.
6.4.80 It is recognised that there will be varying additional costs in providing housing designed specifically for, or to be capable of easy adaptation to wheelchair standards. These can be minimised by considering them at the earliest possible stage, and developers are referred to the Supplementary Planning Guidance.
 
 
Care in the Community
6.4.81 An essential part of care in the community is the integration of people requiring care into the wider community and having equal access to housing and other facilities. Care in the community legislation aims to provide care and services close to where people live.
6.4.82 Fundamental to care in the community is the availability of a range of accommodation to meet the needs of people from all sections of the community. Land use planning has a small but significant role to play in assisting integration by permitting development which contributes to the range of accommodation.
6.4.83 For some people the most appropriate accommodation will be in small households where care may or may not be provided. Within the Use Classes Order 1987 proposals for this type of accommodation, for up to six people, should be dealt with in the same way as those for any other dwellinghouse. Other peoples' housing needs may be met more appropriately in residential or nursing homes. These uses are often proposed in existing residential areas, particularly those comprising older, larger houses which are capable of subdivision or conversion. The Council also determines a number of applications for new-build residential and nursing homes. While conversion of older property can offer opportunities for interaction between residents and neighbours, new build can more easily incorporate many features in terms of access and mobility for residents.
6.4.84 When considering proposals for residential homes or nursing homes the Council will balance the requirements of the residents with those of the employees. It will have regard to regional guidelines on standards (adopted 1994) and the following policy:
 
 
H17 PROPOSALS FOR CHANGES OF USE OR REDEVELOPMENT TO PROVIDE ACCOMMODATION FOR PEOPLE IN NEED OF CARE (E.G. HOSTELS, NURSING HOMES OR RESIDENTIAL INSTITUTIONS) WILL BE EXPECTED TO COMPLY WITH LOCAL STANDARDS ON ROOM SIZES, LAYOUT AND CAR PARKING FOR RESIDENTIAL HOMES, IN RELATION TO ACCESS FOR DISABLED PEOPLE. THE COUNCIL WILL PARTICULARLY ENCOURAGE THE PROVISION OF SUCH ACCOMMODATION WHERE IT IS CONVENIENTLY LOCATED FOR LOCAL SHOPS, SERVICES AND PUBLIC TRANSPORT FACILITIES, SUBJECT TO LOCAL PLANNING, TRAFFIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONSIDERATIONS.
 
 
Supplementary Planning Guidance
6.4.85 A series of Development Control Guidelines have been approved by the Council to further assist the control of development. These guidelines are listed in Appendix 1 and they will constitute material considerations in the determination of planning applications. Here attention is drawn to the Residential Design Guide and Designing Out Crime, which provide design guidance consistent with the Environment policies.
 
 
HOUSING ANNEX
HOUSING ALLOCATIONS
UDP Policy Ref. Location Site
Area (ha.)
Dwellings
To Be
Completed
at 31/12/99
Brownfield /
Greenfield
(% Brownfield)
  NORTHERN AREA      
CAS 13 Ackton Pastures, Castleford
23
461
G
CAS 15 East of Healdfield Road, Castleford
3.6
50
G
CAS 64 Gypsy Lane, Castleford
9
99
B
CAS 65 Lumley Street, Castleford
1.9
56
B
CAS 66 Redhill Avenue, Glasshoughton, Castleford
2.5
65
B
NOR 7 Normanton Golf Course
20.8
541
G
NOR 8 Snydale Road, Normanton
1.5
21
G
NOR 9 Dalefield Road/Gypsy Lane, Normanton
4.9
154
B
NOR 10 Hillcrest, Altofts
1.1
25
G
FTH 5 Kimberley Street / Pretoria Grove, Featherstone
2.2
78
B
FTH 8 Station Lane, Featherstone
0.6
20
B
FTH 29 Cedar Walk, Featherstone
0.7
25
G
PNT 7 Old Hall Farm, Monkhill, Pontefract
20
292
G
PNT 8 Lady Balk Lane, Monkhill, Pontefract
5.3
32
G
PNT 9 Stumpcross Lane, Pontefract
2.6
8
G
PNT 11 Halfpenny Lane, Pontefract
1.3
33
G
PNT 64 South of Willowdene Lane, Lady Balk, Pontefract
3.7
90
B
PNT 65 Schofield's Factory Site, North Baileygate, Pontefract
1.1
33
B
PNT 66 Grove Road, Pontefract
0.5
16
B
KNT 29 Pottery Lane, Knottingley
3.1
70
B
KNT 30 Womersley Road Quarry, Knottingley
7.6
50
B
  Total
117
2,219
32.94%
   
  SOUTH EAST AREA
HEM 3 Farm Lane, Kinsley
3.1
30
G
HEM 4 North of Madeley Road, Havercroft
3
75
G
HEM 5 West of Madeley Road, Ryhill
2.1
36
G
HEM 6 Mulberry Avenue, Ryhill
2.6
99
G
HEM 8 Kirkbygate, Hemsworth
0.9
22
G
HEM 10 Tom Bridge, Wakefield Road, Kinsley
5.2
96
G
HEM 53 Brunswick, Ryhill
0.7
12
G
ACK 3 Poplar Farm, Brackenhill, Ackworth
1.8
37
G
ACK 34 Brackenhill Quarry, Ackworth
2.9
70
B
ACK 35 Station Road / Westfield Grove, Lower Ackworth
0.7
12
B
ACK 36 Barnsley Road, Ackworth
2.2
57
B
EMS 8 High Street, Upton
3.8
5
G
EMS 9 East of School Street, Upton
0.5
12
G
EMS 12 Waggon Lane, Upton
1.5
3
G
EMS 60 Common Lane, Upton
6.3
39
G
EMS 14 Langthwaite Lane, South Kirkby
8.5
235
G
EMS 16 Carr Lane / Faith Street, South. Kirkby
2
16
B
EMS 17 Common Road, South. Kirkby
1
15
G
EMS 20 North Street, South Kirkby
2.8
26
G
EMS 24 Rowley Lane, South. Elmsall
1
18
G
EMS 61 The Brickyard, Westfield Lane, South Elmsall
4.8
120
B
EMS 62 Doncaster Road, South Elmsall
4.4
120
B
EMS 63 Chapel Lane / High Street, South Elmsall
1.2
22
G
  Total
63
1,177
33.56%
         
UDP Policy Ref. Location Site
Area (ha.)
Dwellings
To Be
Completed
at 31/12/99
Brownfield /
Greenfield
(% Brownfield)
  WESTERN AREA
NWS 9 Thornes Road, Lupset, Wakefield
0.4
5
G
NWS 12 Batley Road, Alverthorpe, Wakefield
8.1
128
G
NWS 21 Victoria Street, Outwood
0.6
28
G
NWS 22 Ivy Lane Wakefield
0.9
25
G
NWS 25 North Avenue, Newton Hill, Wakefield
12
174
G
NWS 66 Stanley Royd Hospital, Wakefield (Special Policy Area)
10
200
B
NWS 67 Alverthorpe Mills, Flanshaw Lane, Wakefield
2.7
79
B
NWS 68 Moorhouse Avenue, Stanley
0.7
17
G
NWS 69 Thornes Moor Road, Wakefield
1.3
38
B
NWS 70 Former Westgate Common Mill, Alverthorpe Road, Wakefield
2.1
101
B
NWS 71 Former Victoria Mills, Alverthorpe Road, Wakefield
1
42
B
OH 9 Runtlings Mill, Ossett
0.7
21
B
OH 29 Storrs Hill Road, Horbury Bridge
0.9
21
B
OH 30 Quarry Hill, Horbury Bridge
1.3
20
B
OH 31 Benton Park, Wakefield Road, Horbury
0.4
24
B
OH 32 Church Street, Ossett
5.1
190
B
SEW 5 Walton Lane, Sandal
8.6
100
G
SEW 6 Hendal Lane, Kettlethorpe
5.1
58
G
SEW 53 Denby Dale Road West, Calder Grove
2.1
63
B
SEW 54 Carr Lane, Sandal, Wakefield
2.3
27
G
SEW 55 Painthorpe Lane, Hall Green, Crigglestone
3.1
25
B
SEW 56 Montague Street, Agbrigg, Wakefield
1.4
48
G
SEW 57 Cliff Road, Crigglestone
0.4
16
B
WCS 4 Santingley Lane, Crofton
3
32
G
WCS 7 Sharlston Green, Sharlston
3.1
43
G
WCC 35 Wakefield Waterfront (Special Policy Area)
30.6
200
B
  Total
107.9
1,725
60.29%
  WAKEFIELD MD
287.9
5,121
42.30%
 
HOUSING ALLOCATIONS WHERE AN ELEMENT OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING IS REQUIRED
UDP Policy
Ref.
Location Type of
Affordable
Housing
  NORTHERN AREA  
CAS 13 Ackton Pastures, Castleford General
PNT 11 Halfpenny Lane, Pontefract General
PNT 65 Schofield's Factory Site, North Baileygate, Pontefract General
     
  WESTERN AREA  
NWS 25 North Avenue, Newton Hill, Wakefield General
NWS 66 Stanley Royd Hospital, Wakefield (Special Policy Area) General
OH 9 Runtlings Mill, Ossett General
OH 29 Storrs Hill Road, Horbury Bridge General
OH 30 Quarry Hill, Horbury Bridge General
SEW 5 Walton Lane, Sandal General
SEW 6 Hendal Lane, Kettlethorpe General
WCC 35 Wakefield Waterfront (Special Policy Area) General
 
TopContents